A new attempt at Starliner (update)

Tonight, Boeing will once again attempt to shoot the Starliner in the direction of the International Space Station.

These are exciting times for space travel. Billionaire Richard Branson flew 84 kilometers in SpaceShipOne, but was overtaken less than a month later by Uber billionaire Jeff Bezos who climbed 106 kilometers with his New Shepard rocket So you really got to space. Another milestone is on the agenda for Friday, July 30th at 8pm. Then Boeing’s Starliner will make a new test flight and the launch can follow directly. (Below what should happen).

Aug 4th update: The drone flight has been postponed indefinitely. The July 30 launch was already postponed to August 3, but that was also canceled due to issues – perhaps problems with the valve actuator or valve. The true cause has not been discovered.

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Failures

The Boeing CST-100 Starliner is a reusable spacecraft that made its first test flight in December 2019 and will perform manned flights to IS It must be. But that turned out differently.

miscarriage, miscarriage

Before Boeing can operate regular flights, the company must first complete three test flights. It turned out to be more difficult than expected. The first, the Pad Abort test, designed to test whether the capsule could move far enough from the missile if something went wrong during launch, failed in part because one of the three landing parachutes failed to deploy.

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starliner

Hobby

The second test, the unmanned orbital flight test, was intended to see if the Starliner could dock independently at the International Space Station. The launch was successful, but the spacecraft came Not in the right job To get to Earth to get to the International Space Station. Later it turned out that it was the result of an amateur mistake. The Starliner’s system clock was eleven hours behind, so the system timing was wrong. He landed a few days later in the New Mexico desert.

Friday’s unmanned test flight, Orbital Flight Test 2, which was said to cost Boeing $410 million, is a test run included to see if the problems are resolved. It can be watched live on Friday via the link below.

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https://youtu.be/BJtHLnvliv8

Sources: Boeing, NASA

Photo: NASA

Winton Frazier

 "Amateur web lover. Incurable travel nerd. Beer evangelist. Thinker. Internet expert. Explorer. Gamer."

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