Can you compensate for sleep deprivation with willpower? – the health

After a short night you do not feel very fit, which may affect your work performance during the day. The negative effect of sleep deprivation arises because fatigue takes away motivation. New research now shows that this can be addressed by betting on moods.

A new study by organizational scientist Jakob Stollberger (VU University Amsterdam) shows that believing that your willpower is limitless helps you stay effective at work, especially on sleep-deprived days. In his research, Stollberger combined two diary studies with a pooled sample of 214 employees and 1,317 working days.

fruitful working day

“While it is well known that adequate sleep is critical to a productive day at work, it is unclear how a lack of sleep affects employee effectiveness and what can be done about it,” says Jakob Stollberger. “On the other hand, our data shows that lack of sleep reduces psychological resources such as willpower and motivation. On the other hand, the data also indicates that employees’ attitudes about whether willpower is limited or unlimited have a strong impact on employee performance, especially on days Sleep-deprived. The belief that your willpower is limitless can compensate for a lack of sleep and fuel a productive work day.” Employees who, on the other hand, are convinced that their willpower is limited, rely more on the duration of their sleep to self-regulate in order to recover adequately. The study concerns the short-term or episodic effect of sleep deprivation.

source: The role of organizational, emotional, and motivational resources in the negative repercussions of sleep at home on employee effectiveness at work.University of Wuppertal, University of Amsterdam and Aston University.

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A new study by organizational scientist Jakob Stollberger (VU University Amsterdam) shows that believing that your willpower is limitless helps you stay effective at work, especially on sleep-deprived days. In his research, Stollberger combined two diary studies with a pooled sample of 214 employees and 1,317 working days. “While it is well known that adequate sleep is critical to a productive day at work, it is unclear how a lack of sleep affects employee effectiveness and what can be done about it,” says Jakob Stollberger. “On the other hand, our data shows that lack of sleep reduces psychological resources such as willpower and motivation. On the other hand, the data also indicates that employees’ attitudes about whether willpower is limited or unlimited have a strong impact on employee performance, especially on days Sleep-deprived. The belief that your willpower is limitless can compensate for a lack of sleep and fuel a productive work day.” Employees who, on the other hand, are convinced that their willpower is limited, rely more on the duration of their sleep to self-regulate in order to recover adequately. The study concerns the short-term or episodic effect of sleep deprivation. Source: “The role of organizational, emotional, and motivational resources in the inverse diffusion of sleep in the home domain to employee effectiveness at work,” University of Wuppertal, University of Amsterdam and Aston University.

Megan Vasquez

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