Study: Vaccine to reduce risk of cervical cancer

The number of cervical cancers has decreased in British women who have been vaccinated against the HPV infection that causes these cancers. This is according to a recently published study.

“Our study provides direct evidence of the effect of vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV), via the bivalent Cervarix vaccine, on the incidence of cervical cancer,” said the authors of the study published today. scalpel.

Cervical cancer is almost always caused by a sexually transmitted HPV infection. Vaccines against this infection have been available since the mid-2000s. So many countries, including Belgium, have started a campaign since 2016 to encourage people to get vaccinated against this.

According to the results of the study, there was a significant decrease in the number of cervical cancers in women eligible for the vaccination campaign in the United Kingdom, which began in the late 2000s. This decrease is more pronounced in women who were vaccinated at 12 or 13 years of age.

However, there are limitations associated with the study. Because even without vaccination, there are only a limited number of cervical cancers in women younger than 25, who were studied. Thus, frequency in that age group will also have to be studied in the coming years.

“Our study provides direct evidence of the effect of vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV), via the bivalent Cervarix vaccine, on cervical cancer,” the authors of the study published in The Lancet said. Cervical cancer is almost always caused by a sexually transmitted HPV infection. Vaccines against this infection have been available since the mid-2000s. So many countries, including Belgium, have started a campaign since 2016 to encourage people to get vaccinated against this. According to the results of the study, there was a significant decrease in the number of cervical cancers in women eligible for the vaccination campaign in the United Kingdom, which began in the late 2000s. This decrease is more pronounced in women who were vaccinated at 12 or 13 years of age. However, there are limitations associated with the study. Because even without vaccination, there are only a limited number of cervical cancers in women younger than 25, who were studied. Thus, frequency in that age group will also have to be studied in the coming years.

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Megan Vasquez

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