‘Some people want to get stuck in the nineties; We are mainly ourselves’

If you are familiar with the British indie scene, The Snuts will undoubtedly mean something to you. Since 2016, the Scottish Quartet has operated through numerous European positions and British charts. After two EPs, including the desirable ones Mixstep E.P. Meets Festival GoodAll of your friends”, The time has come soon: debut album WL Will hit the shelves on April 2nd. We talked to the man before Jack Cochrane Release pending. He certainly could not hide his excitement.

First, how are you?

Definitely not bad! Our first album is about to be released, which has kept us busy in recent months. So we can still play music, which is enough to make us happy.

Despite the circumstances, can I say that last year was really the most productive year for the band?

Really yes? You sometimes start to feel guilty that this was a good year for you. Especially since there are many who experience a difficult time. For us it is a great opportunity to focus fully on music. We have made many decisions that determine how we want to profile ourselves as a team. So on the whole, we should definitely not complain.

Can you tell us a little more about the album tour that will usually take you through the UK this year?

With the information we currently receive, we are still positive. The further evolution of the guidelines is certainly unpredictable. Above all, we continue to work hard to provide a better performance when this is finally possible. When you consider the impact of the lack of direct sector on people, it assures us that everyone is eager to attend events again. When it is allowed again, it is a blast!

I have already had the opportunity to listen to the intro album, first and foremost, worthy congratulations on the final conclusion. During which period were the songs written? So I know the “Glasgow” demo was already distributed in 2016.

Yes it is right. We see this album as a work of life. For example, the album launcher “Top Tech” is now ten years old. With the album we tried to explain the path we had already traveled. Musically and as a group.

Has the band been around for so long?

No. We were already writing music before they saw us as a band. This also means that we are not so good at playing cards, so naturally I wrote myself without fail. As we worked on this album, we felt like those old songs really belonged to complete the story. We wanted to offer something special to the fans who supported us from the beginning. For example, we re-recorded “Glasgow” without much damage to the original feature of the original demo. We went a little more testing for the other songs on this album.

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Is the writing process a group event or are you more responsible for it?

Usually I write my own first and then bring it to the boys. No really small discussion. At the moment of death I would often play something new and then get quick feedback from the rest by adding extra tools. If no one responds, the song will be in the little black book, so we will never hear it again. (Laughs)

The title of the album WL Note on Whitburn Loopy where you grew up. Do you think oatmeal is generally Scottish?

Yes of course. Since we are a small country there are a lot of competitions and the scene is very closed. Numerous Scottish acts have erupted in recent years. It comes with a part of pride, but with extra pressure. As long as we mention enough titles in our songs that are recognizable to Scottish youth, we are on the right track, I think. Mental health is definitely one of them.

You had the opportunity to work with Grammy nominated producer Tony Hofer (The Cooks, The Fratellis, Beck). In what ways was the final sound of the album affected?

Before that there were a lot of songs where something was always missing. When Tony started working on these songs, he actually turned them out. What I personally like about Tony overseas are the American influences he leaves on an album. That’s why I think he was often asked to work on those huge UK indie albums. When I got several songs he mixed before the album recordings, the connection was very quick. We’ve already worked with a lot of producers, and they’re mostly unusual, but Tony is a real experience. He reassured us immediately and gave us confidence in the music we were creating. At the same time, he asked us to take risks that we would not have taken without him.

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The deluxe version of the album has four soundtracks. How did these come about?

When I think of the deluxe version, I think of songs mainly for us friends. We didn’t really realize that the whole band had to perform those songs. Maybe it’s timeless, but it’s true that at the last minute they didn’t add it to the original tracklist. At the last minute I went to the studio with a cellist and no songs were recorded at any time. For me it also felt like a gesture to deliver as much new material as possible to the fans.

Today, releasing an album is also a big difference from the past. Most listeners find their way through streaming services such as Apple Music or Spotify. Those extra songs allowed us to find a little more.

There is a huge variety throughout the track list throughout the album. In addition to the slow, vocal songs, songs like “Elephants” also use synth pads to blow the roof. Are there any songs that need extra support during a live set to recreate that awesome sound?

This is a good question asked for the first time! (Laughs) When we went to work in the studio I think we didn’t immediately think about how we would perform the songs live. It may have come in the way of some constructive results. Infection is due to make many changes in our live structure, which may seem a bit unusual for the average guitar band. I see this as a modernization of our live sound. It’s not easy, but I think we are now.

Speaking of live sets, you played on the main stage of DRNSMT in 2019. That day you shared the stage with giant names like Catfish & The Bottlemen and DMA. How was it for a band that didn’t even release or announce an album?

Definitely great! A year ago we were playing on a small platform at TRNSMT. I think this ambition is precisely for the larger phases that keep many phases alive. We always aim for something bigger than we have already done. Really we haven’t played so much in Scotland yet? We have always been focused on promoting our music as much as possible. So, playing a home game in front of an overwhelming audience on that day in 2019 gave us the confidence that we were at least doing something right.

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The energy you radiate on stage is highly contagious. Are there any rituals you already do to counteract the nerves? Buckfast (wine with a caffeine, very popular among Scottish youth) is certainly besides comfort and authenticity.

(Laughs) I think bands like us with sets like DRNSMT 2019 have a certain impact; It’s not ready for a stage or audience of that size. I remember being scared to finish from the beginning. It’s not a bar for me if the audience is 100 or 10,000 people, I’m very nervous anyway. I usually spend an hour on my own with my headphones on or some music. Fortunately, we have four best friends who share a close relationship. We lose a lot of that contact with each other during shows.

What kind of music has been playing through your headphones in recent months?

More and more sad music during epidemics, really? I like it anyway. National, Nathaniel Radolife, Bon Iver அனைத்து All the musicians I really see as a songwriter. In fact, I cry for two hours a day. (Laughs)

You and Time (Wilson, fascist) came up with another technique with white socks technique, where you explain that wearing white socks makes your band people look more serious. I was wondering if this technique continued while creating the album and if you still recommend it.

Of course! (Laughs) For us it goes more than white socks. When your band starts to get some traction, your fans are very attached to how you profile. From the moment you start to change things, you should appear confident instead of trying to please the average reviewer. So for us they are white socks and some play with us Aesthetics. We are confident enough; You choose whether to jump on our train or not. Especially in the indie scene, fans are well aware of what they want. Some people want you to join in the 1990s, but we’re not interested in that. We always make changes in our music. And white socks are normal Thug. (Laughs)

WL, The first album of these sympathetic comrades will be released on April 2nd. You can already expect our unannounced feedback.

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Ferdinand Woolridge

 "Subtly charming analyst. Beer maven. Future teen idol. Twitter guru. Lifelong bacon fan. Pop culture lover. Passionate social media evangelist."

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