A single dose of AstraZeneca vaccine “little or no effective” against the Indian variant coronavirus | Science

A single dose of AstraZeneca vaccine is “little or no effective” against the Indian variant of Coronavirus. This is the conclusion of the French Pasteur Institute after laboratory tests. The complete vaccination with two Pfizer vaccines remains effective and shows only a “slightly lower” efficacy against the Indian variant, compared to the British vaccine.




The Pfizer / BioNTech vaccine produces antibodies that can neutralize the Indian variant of the Coronavirus, as the famous institute concluded in a new study, which It only appeared in a pre-release post. According to the researchers, a slightly lower effect was found against the in vitro variant compared to the British dominant variant.

“Despite the slightly reduced effect, the Pfizer vaccine may be preventive,” researcher Olivier Schwartz told AFP.

(Read more below the video: The Welfare and Health Agency asks not to miss the second shot)

However, there is very little good news about the AstraZeneca vaccine. Tests show that a single dose “provides very little protection against Indian and South African species”. The vaccine has been shown to be effective against the British variant. But Schwartz said a single dose of AstraZeneca was “little or no effective” against the Indian alternative. The variant was first identified in India in October 2020 and has since spread across the globe. In the United Kingdom, among other countries, the alternative is gaining popularity in various domestic groups.

The results are especially important for vaccination with AstraZeneca, as there is a long period of 8 or 12 weeks between the two vaccinations with AstraZeneca, so the majority of the population has only received one injection. The lack of adequate data is also the reason why the Pasteur Institute has not yet been able to determine the efficacy of the dosages of AstraZeneca versus the Indian alternative.

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